Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Censored Blog Brenda Norrell 2004 --2006

Censored: "Trespassing" film
Home | Mohawks O'odham Border Solidarity | CENSORED: Apache protest Rep Renzi | CENSORED Louise Benally | Alcatraz Sunrise | ALCATRAZ PHOTOS | Western Shoshone and Navajo Solidarity | Photos 2006 | Pentagon spies on Quakers | Marcos in Sonora, Mexico | Indigenous turn cameras on Border Patrol | O'odham ran over by Border Patrol | Border Patrol/occupying army | Photos, A Salute to Courage | Censored: "Trespassing" film | Film: Horror in Canada | Nuclear Free Heroes | AIDS BEAR Project | XIT message of the Red Man | CENSORED: Pollution in Dinetah | Secrets | Indians disposables to nuclear industry | Border Guardian assaulted teens | Photo Imprisoned Children at Bosque Redondo | Amnesty: US torture | CENSORED Dinetah | UNCENSORED Buffy | CENSORED Rumsfeld profiteer Bird Flu | MEDIA SPIN | Yaqui in Sonora ban pesticides

Carlos Demenezes
carlos.jpg
Photo Brenda Norrell

 
 
Here's one of the films you haven't seen at Sundance Film Festival: "Trespassing" by Brazilian filmmaker Carlos DeMenezes.
 
This highly-censored film (by yes, all those cool avant-garde film festivals) reveals how members of the Mohave and Colorado River Indian Tribes, with the help of the American Indian Movement and environmentalists, halted the proposed hazardous waste dump at Ward Valley. The long occupation is shown in the film, along with Western Shoshone protesting nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site.
The Tucson International Film Festival featured the film and awarded "Trespassing," a rare Trustee Award. Although the film won top awards at a festival in Spain, and the Indigenous film festival in Oaxaca, DeMenezes said the film has been rejected at most festivals around the world.
Sundance rejected it twice.
Sundance, like the other hip film festivals, responded that it receives a real big number of films each year and sadly has to reject many.
OK, but I've been to Sundance. Sadly, most of the films were a chore to watch -- either there was no story or the films were just too depressing to endure.
The last year I went, I was miserable. There was the long drive to the Salt Lake City Motel 6, because everything in Park City, as always, was booked up and overpriced.Then, as always, there was falling on the ice, and limping around, after driving around for hours looking for a park in Park City.
Each year, even with a big fat Sundance press pass, it has been impossible to get tickets to actually see the movies I need to review for American Indian newspapers.
So, no kidding, the last time I went, I checked out video copies of the Native films and sat in a little dark room in the Park City library and watched all the movies I needed to review.
After throwing up on rich, free finger food at one of the gatherings, and watching a few Hollywood gods glorified, I slid back to the dirty Motel 6 in Salt Lake City, and then slid back down the icy roads to Arizona. My last trip to Sundance was right up there with the worst experiences of my life.
Back to the rejections of "Trespassing."
There's many good films coming out on American Indian sacred lands, resistance movements and desecration from mining. Hopefully, you'll be seeing these at Sundance.
--bn

UPDATE ON SCREENINGS
 
"Trespassing" will have its Australia premiere on February 10, 2007 at the Bryon Bay Film Festival:

Also the film will be screened in Stuttgart, Germany on March 23, 2007 (tentative screening date)

 

The screenings of  "Trespassing" are on the website:
http://www.trespassingdocumentary.com/. We have our trailer on youtube and myspace.com. -- Carlos Demenezes